Wednesday, August 7

Garden Pic Wednesday: Bi-Color Hydrangea

I'm slow getting to this today--it's nearly 5 pm, but there's been a thunder shower hanging overhead for the past hour and I didn't want to be on the computer while lightning was going on.

Today's garden pic is of my unique Hydrangea:
Two colors on one bush!

Blue blossoms appeared earlier this spring on stems from middle to rear of shrub and, presently, front-edge stems are bearing pink!
I obtained this particular Hydrangea as a rooted cutting from flower shop I used to work at. Someone else had snipped it from a pink hydrangea, and, long story short, I ended up bringing the cutting home. I planted it in the bed opposite my front door, where it flourished and grew large.
First blooms were pink, then the next year, were mysteriously blue. I thought my acidy soil had caused it to revert, then this year it bloomed both blue, then later pink. Mystery solved! It's both colors!

Surprise!

 Other Hydrangeas I have:
I have 2 lavender I ordered from a catalog as rooted babies.
 (photo below.)
 They run lavender to raspberry in color. Both are young and in a competitive environment under trees, but are starting to reach an age where I may expect more blooms from them in coming years.
Lavender Hydrangea (my own)

I also have 2 traditional blue hydrangeas in the back, more wooded bed. 
One was a leftover from the flower shop that couldn't be sold. It was either was past it's prime to send out or the heads were clipped for some other purpose. Either way, it got sent home with me. It's tried putting out a couple small blooms, which were dark blue with white centers, something like this sample photo, though the blue was darker and more prominent.

Internet sample photo

The other blue , I've never seen. It was part of a shade garden grab-bag from a catalog and is still a baby. It's been struggling in it's current location and I want to move it to the north side of my house where it will be the feature plant of my future shade rain garden. Hydrangea's traditionally perform best on a north side. 

Finally, I have a gorgeous variegated blue Lace Cap that I grew from a cutting off a neighbors shrub.
 (Good thing, too, since they got rid of theirs last year!)
The leaves are creamy white with green, so it stands out, though it, too, is young with only a couple branches.
 Still it pops out at least one mini-bloom in spring.
A Lace Cap Hydrangea has a flat shape, as in this sample photo:

Internet sample photo
Hydrangea are low maintenance and enjoy the deep south climate.
They don't need hedging. 

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